SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DAILY RSS FEED!
Facebook
Date posted: February 17, 2013

Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching

I’m working my way through a 33-page review of scholarship on instructional change in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) disciplines. The authors reviewed an impressive 191 conceptual and empirical journal articles. However, what they found isn’t impressive both in terms of the quality of the scholarship on this topic and in terms of instructional change in general.

It’s not the first article I’ve read of late on the various barriers that stand in the way of change in higher education.

The literature is not encouraging, but I think there are some fairly straightforward principles that give any new teaching strategy, technique or approach a much greater chance of success. Out of that success will grow the courage and motivation to implement even more instructional changes.

1. Think about what needs to change before deciding on a change

2. Lay the groundwork for the

3. Incorporate change  .

4. Change a little before changing a

5. Determine in advance how you will know whether the change is a success

6. Have realistic expectations for

Read the full article

Comments

1. Comments will be moderated. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name, to   avoid rejection.
2. Comments that are abusive, personal, incendiary or irrelevant cannot be published.
3. Please write complete sentences. Do not type comments in all capital letters, or in all   lower case letters, or using abbreviated text. (example: u cannot substitute for you, d is not   'the', n is not 'and')


*

Comment moderation is enabled. Your comment may take some time to appear.