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Date posted: May 22, 2012

Planning and Evaluation cell of the department of AYUSH published 23rd issue of AYUSH 2011 this month. This publication provides reliable and authenticated data/statistics and covers various aspects of AYUSH infrastructural statistics. The data contained in the publication has been collected from various sources and agencies across India

Infrastructural facilities
The present chapter provides an overview of the Infrastructural Facilities in respect of AYUSH  System of medicines in India. It contains various indicators relating to healthcare delivery system and mechanism under the AYUSH system in India. These health structure indicators include educational infrastructure as well as service infrastructure. The database provided here will definitely serve as an authentic source of information for researchers, planners etc. via providing them a base for planning and policy formulation regarding AYUSH.

The Department of AYUSH is collecting the data on various aspects of AYUSH including infrastructural facilities available in India from various sources on annual basis. Since creation of a separate  epartment of AYUSH, a positive impact has been observed in growth of almost all AYUSH infrastructural facilities due to Departmental investment and focus on overall development of these systems since 8th plan onwards. During the successive plan periods, the departmental investment had shown an increasing annual growth rate. Financial investment of the department of AYUSH was Rs. 33.04 Crore in 1997-98, which has increased to Rs. 848.44 crore in 2010-11, showing an annual growth rate of 26.2% since 9th Plan onwards.

AYUSH Hospitals:
There were 3193 AYUSH hospitals in the country as on  1.4.2011. Maximum number of hospitals (2420) is Ayurveda hospitals, whereas, 258, 269, 23 and  215 hospitals pertain to Unani, Siddha, Naturopathy and Homoeopathy systems respectively.

There are only 6 Yoga hospitals and two Sowa-Rigpa (Amchi) hospitals in  India. On an average, AYUSH  hospitals have grown at the rate of 1.0% per annum since 1993.

Ayurveda hospitals registered a growth of 0.8% per annum, whereas, average annual growth rates of 2.1%, 4.8%, and 0.4% have been registered in the hospitals under  Unani, Siddha, Yoga and Naturopathy systems respectively.  On an average, Homoeopathy hospitals have declined by 1.6% per annum during 1993-2011. Yoga hospital have also declined by 1.5 % per annum during 2001-2011.

Bed Strength of AYUSH Hospitals:
There were 56842 beds under AYUSH hospitals in the country as on 1.4.2011.

Maximum number of beds (42271) has been reported in Ayurveda hospitals, whereas, 3684, 2360, 37, 659, 7799 and 32 beds pertain to Unani, Siddha, Yoga, Naturopathy,  Homoeopathy and Sowa-Rigpa (Amchi) hospitals respectively. On an average, beds of AYUSH hospitals have  grown at the rate of 2.4% per annum since 1993. Average annual growth rates of 2.8%, 0.7%, 2.9%, 0.8% and 1.2% have been registered in the bed strengths of Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, , Homoeopathy and Sowa-Rigpa (Amchi) respectively during 1993-2011, whereas, bed strength of Yoga and Naturopathy hospitals have declined by 15.6% and 1.5% per annum respectively.

AYUSH Dispensaries:
 As on 1.4.2011, 24280 AYUSH dispensaries existed in the country. Maximum number of dispensaries (15017) have been recorded in Ayurveda system of medicine, whereas, 1021,  821, 140, 97, 7049 and 135 are Unani, Siddha, Yoga, Naturopathy, Homoeopathy and SowaRigpa (Amchi) dispensaries respectively.

On an average, AYUSH dispensaries have increased at the rate of 0.8% per annum during 1993-2011. Ayurveda dispensaries registered a growth of 0.6% per annum  only, whereas, annual growth rates of 0.3%, 5.4%, 0.6% and 4.3%  have been registered in Unani, Siddha, Homoeopathy and Sowa-Rigpa (Amchi) dispensaries respectively during the period  1993-2011. Average annual growth rate of 5.6% have been registered for Naturopathy dispensaries whereas Yoga dispensaries have by 8.0% per annum during 2001-2011.

Registered Practitioners under AYUSH Systems:
Human resource indicators cover the details  of AYUSH practitioners in the country.

These indicators provide an overview of the availability of ISM & Homoeopathy practitioners, and also give an idea of regional distribution and disparities.

There were 712121 AYUSH registered practitioners through out the country as reported by State Boards/Councils of Indian Systems of Medicine and  Homoeopathy (ISM&H)  as on 1.4.2011. Maximum 429246 practitioners have been registered under Ayurveda System, whereas, 224279 practitioners are under Homoeopathy System.  Only, 49431, 7568 and 1597 practitioners have been registered under Unani, Siddha and Naturopathy systems respectively. On an average, registered practitioners under AYUSH systems have grown at the rate of 1.3% per annum during 1993-2011. The number of Ayurveda registered practitioners observed a growth of 1.1% per annum only, whereas, average annual growth rates of 1.2%  and 1.8% has been registered in Unani and  Homoeopathy practitioners respectively during 1993-2011. However, on an average, the number of registered practitioners of Naturopathy has increased by 11.5% per annum during the period 1988- 2011. Similarly, there is 2.7% average annual growth rate of Siddha practitioners during the period 2004-2011.

Under Graduate Colleges under AYUSH Systems:
A considerable  increase in AYUSH colleges/Teaching institutions has been observed during 1993-2011.  There were 504 AYUSH under Graduate Colleges with admission  capacities for 25376 students through out the country as on 1.4.2011.

Maximum 260 Under Graduate Colleges with admission capacities for 9927 students belonged to Ayurveda, whereas, 183 Under Graduate Colleges with admission capacities for 12658 students were under Homoeopathy system. Only, 40, 7 and 14 Under Graduate Colleges with admission capacities for 1791, 350 and 650 students belonged to Unani, Siddha and Naturopathy systems respectively. On an average, Under Graduate colleges under AYUSH Systems have grown at the rate 3.4% per annum during the last four Five Year Plans.

Ayurveda Under Graduate colleges registered the growth of 4.7% per annum, whereas, average annual growth rates of 2.2%, 7.2%, 8.9% and 2.8% were registered for the Unani, Siddha,  Naturopathy and Homoeopathy Under Graduate colleges respectively during 1993-2011. Similarly, on an average, admission capacities of Under Graduate colleges under AYUSH systems have grown at the rate 5.2% per annum, while, Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, Naturopathy and Homoeopathy Under Graduate colleges have been grown by 3.8%, 4.0%, 4.6%, 13.2% and 6.5% respectively during 1993-2011.

Post Graduate Colleges under AYUSH Systems:
Post-Graduate education comprises a significant component of teaching institutions under various systems of AYUSH.  There were 117 AYUSH Post  Graduate Colleges with admission capacities for 2424 students (including six exclusive Post Graduate colleges with their admission capacities for 216 students) were in existence in the country  as on 1.4.2011. Maximum 67 Post Graduate colleges with their admission capacities for 1293 students belong to Ayurveda system,  whereas, 41 Post Graduate colleges with their admission capacities for 905 students were under Homoeopathy system. Only, 6 and 3 Post Graduate Colleges with their admission capacities for 100 and 126 students belonged to Unani and Siddha systems respectively. On an average, the number of Post Graduate Colleges under AYUSH systems has grown at the rate 5.4% per annum and their admission capacities have grown by 8.2% per annum during 1993-2011. The average annual growth rates of 4.2%, 5.2%, 3.9% and 8.5% have been registered in the strengths of Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy Post Graduate colleges, whereas, their admission capacities have been grown by 6.0%, 2.5%, 8% and 17.6% annually respectively during 1993-2011.

Drug Manufacturing Units under AYUSH Systems:
There were 8896 manufacturing units existing in the country as on 1.4.2011, engaged in manufacturing the AYUSH drugs. Maximum 7699 manufacturing units were engaged in manufacturing of Ayurveda drugs, whereas, 437, 346 and 414 manufacturing units were involved in manufacturing of Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy drugs respectively. A marginal growth trend of 0.01% per annum was (g) Drug Manufacturing Units under AYUSH Systems:

There were 8896 manufacturing units existing in the country as on 1.4.2011, engaged in manufacturing the AYUSH drugs. Maximum 7699 manufacturing units were engaged in manufacturing of Ayurveda drugs, whereas, 437, 346 and 414 manufacturing units were involved in manufacturing of Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy drugs respectively. A marginal growth trend of 0.01% per annum was (g) Drug Manufacturing Units under AYUSH Systems:

There were 8896 manufacturing units existing in the country as on 1.4.2011, engaged in manufacturing the AYUSH drugs. Maximum 7699 manufacturing units were  engaged in manufacturing of Ayurveda drugs, whereas, 437, 346 and 414 manufacturing units were involved in manufacturing of Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy  drugs respectively. A marginal growth trend of 0.01% per annum was (g) Drug anufacturing Units under AYUSH Systems:

Medical Education
The Central Council of Indian medicine (CCIM) is the statutory body constituted under the ‘Indian Medicine Central Council Act 1970’ which lays down the standards of medical education in Ayurved, Siddha and Unani through its various regulations. Similarly, Homoeopathy medical education is being regulated by Central Council of Homoeopathy (CCH) through its various regulations under the ‘Homoeopathy Central Council Act, 1973. For medical education in Yoga & Naturopathy, no such governing body exists.

Under Graduate  Under Graduate Education:
 A separate Department for Indian Systems of Medicine and Homoeopathy was established in 1995. Since then, there has been a substantial increase in the number of AYUSH colleges in the country. There were 504 colleges conducting undergraduate AYUSH education with an admission capacity of 25376 students in India as on 1.4.2011.

Out of which, 29.7% of the total colleges with 33.8% intake capacity belong to Government Sector. About 51.6% of the colleges with 39.1% admission capacity were of Ayurveda whereas about 36.3% of the colleges with 49.2% admission capacity belong to Homoeopathy. Only 12.1% of the colleges with 11.1% admission capacity pertain to Unani, Siddha and Naturopathy systems of medicine.

 As on 01.04.2011, only 24 states/ UTs were imparting medical education at under graduate level. The State of Maharashtra had a lead over other states for having the maximum number of AYUSH colleges  (23.0%), and also having maximum number of Ayurveda (24.2%) and Homoeopathy (25.7%) colleges in the country. The states of Uttar Pradesh and Tamil Nadu had the maximum number of Unani (27.5%) and Naturopathy (28.6%) colleges respectively. As Siddha system of medicine is widely practiced in the state of Tamil Nadu, 85.7% of the Siddha colleges hail from this State.

It has been observed that there is lack of AYUSH colleges in the NorthEastern States and the Union Territories. There were no AYUSH college in the states of Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland,  Sikkim, and Tripura and in the Union territories of Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Dadra & Nagar Haveli, Daman & Diu, Lakshadweep and Puducherry as on 1.4.2011. Apart from this, there were no Ayurvedic college in the state of Arunachal Pradesh and no Homoeopathic Graduate College in the state of Jammu & Kashmir. Colleges imparting Unani medical education existed in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Delhi, Jammu & Kashmir, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal only. Siddha colleges existed in the states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu only. Medical education in Naturopathy was being imparted in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

Average annual growth rate of 3.8% and 5.5% were observed in AYUSH colleges imparting under graduate courses and their admission capacity respectively during 1992-2011. Maximum of 13.8% annual  growth was observed in 1993-94 in AYUSH colleges while maximum of 26% annual growth was observed in admission capacity of total colleges in 2000. Average annual growth rates of 4.7%, 2.3%, 6.8%, 2.9% and 8.4% had been attained in Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha,  Homoeopathy and Naturopathy colleges respectively  during 1992-2011, while the admission capacities under these systems had grown annually by 4.5%, 4.0%,4.6%, 6.5% and 12.4% respectively. The maximum annual growth rates of 21.1%, 19.4%, 30.4% and 66.7% were realized in the number of colleges of Ayurveda, Unani, Homoeopathy and Naturopathy in 1992-93, 1999-2000, 1993-94 and 1997-98 respectively. Siddha colleges augmented 2.1 times in the year 2003 over 2001. Maximum annual growth rates of 20.4%, 25.3%,  60% and 41.6% were realized in the admission  capacities of colleges of Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy in 2003, 1996, 2002 and 2000  respectively. Admission capacity of Naturopathy colleges increased 1.7 times in 2011 over 2010.   Over the period 1992 to 2011, admission capacity had increased significantly (more than one and half times) with an average admission capacity of 37.4 per college in 1992, it  had gone up to 50.3 per College in 2011. Average admission capacity for Ayurveda Colleges had decreased from 39.6 in 1992 to 38.2 per college in 2011. However, intake capacity of Unani Colleges, has gone up from 32.5 in 1992 to 44.8 in 2011. Similarly, the average admission capacities of Homoeopathy and Naturopathy Colleges had increased from 36 and 23.3 in 1992 to 69.2 and 46.4 in 2011 respectively. However, the average admission capacity of Siddha Colleges had gone down from 75 in 1992 to 50 in 2011. The maximum intake capacity  of 56.9 per AYUSH College was realised during the year 2008. The maximum intake capacities of Ayurveda, Unani and Homoeopathy colleges was observed in 2008, whereas, the maximum intake capacities of 77.5 per Siddha college and 46.4 per Naturopathy college were observed during the periods 1993-1997 and 2011 respectively.

States and Union territories having higher (greater than or equal to 60 students) average admission capacities for all the AYUSH colleges in 2011 were  Delhi, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh and Maharashtra, whereas, states  with low (less than 40 students) average admission capacities in 2011 were Orissa, Punjab,Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and Chandigarh. The state of Jammu & Kashmir had the maximum average  admission capacity of 90 students per College and Bihar had minimum average admission capacity of 12.7students per college in Ayurveda in 2011. The State of Andhra Pradesh had the maximum average admission capacity of 62 students per Unani College, and Rajasthan had the lowest average admission capacity of 20 students per Unani College in 2011. Maximum intake capacity of 95.3 students per College was observed in the State of Gujarat under Homoeopathy, whereas the lowest of 32.5 students per College was registered in Orissa. The states of Tamil Nadu and Kerala had the same intake capacity of 50 students per college under (b) Post Graduate Courses under AYUSH systems:

Since the creation of a separate Department of Indian System of Medicine and Homoeopathy in 1995, Post Graduate education had been introduced in a number of  existing AYUSH colleges. As on 01.04.2011, there were 117 colleges with admission capacity of 2424 students imparting post graduate education in India. Out of which, 29.7% colleges with 33.8% admission capacity pertain to Government Sector. 55.8% of total post graduate colleges with 53.3% of total admission capacity were of Ayurveda whereas 35.1  % colleges with 37.7% of admission capacity belonged to Homoeopathy. Only 6.3% of the post graduate colleges with 6.4% admission capacity belonged to other systems of AYUSH.

Out of all medical colleges imparting post graduate AYUSH education, six colleges with admission capacity of 216 students were exclusively post graduate institutions. One exclusive post graduate college each of Unani and Siddha systems with admission capacities of  38 and 46 existed in the states of Karnataka and Tamil Nadu respectively, whereas, two exclusive post graduate Ayurveda college each with admissioncapacities of 50 and 10  existed in the states of Gujarat and West Bengal. One exclusive post graduateHomoeopathy College each with admission capacities of 36 and 36 were in the states of Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh respectively.

There was a surge in demand for post graduate education in AYUSH systems and to meet it, the facility of getting medical education at post graduate level is available in 18 states.

Maharashtra had maximum number of AYUSH colleges (36%), it had also maximum numbers of Ayurveda (36.9%) and Homoeopathy (35.9%) postgraduate  colleges, whereas Uttar Pradesh had maximum number of Unani (40%) colleges. Neither the states of Arunachal Pradesh, Goa, Haryana, Jharkhand, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim, Tripura nor any of the union territories of India except NCT of Delhi had a single postgraduate AYUSH college. Apart from these, the state of Tamil Nadu had no Ayurveda Postgraduate college and the states of Assam, Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand had no Homoeopathy college. The colleges imparting Unani medical education existed in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Delhi, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Uttar Pradesh only. Postgraduate education in Siddha existed in the State of Tamil Nadu only.

Average annual growth rate of 5.4% was registered in 2011 over 1993 in post graduate AYUSH colleges and admission capacity had grown 8.2%. Average annual growth rates of 4.2%, 5.2% and 3.9% had been attained in the number of colleges of Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha respectively during the period 1993 to 2011. However, within the same period, admission capacities under Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha had grown annually by 6.0%, 2.5% and 8% respectively. Average annual growth rates of Homoeopathy Colleges and their admission capacities had been observed as 8.5% and 17.6% respectively during the period 1993 to  2011. The maximum of 45.5%, 66.7%, 100% and 50% annual growths had been realized in the number of colleges of Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy in 2000, 2001, 2000 and 2000 respectively. Maximum annual growth rates of 23.1% and 37.5% were realized in the admission capacities of Ayurveda and Unani colleges in the years 2000 and 1994 respectively. Admission capacities increased by 3 times in case of Siddha in the year 2000 and more than 1.5 and 2.5 times in case of Homoeopathy colleges in the year 2000  and 2002 respectively over their previous years.

Over the period 1992 to 2011, average admission capacity has increased significantly (about 1.5  times), with an average admission capacity of 14.5 per college in 1992, it had gone up to 19.9 per college in 2011. An increasing trend had been observed in the admission capacity of Ayurveda, as average admission  capacity for Ayurveda colleges had increased from 14.2 in 1992 to 19.0 per college in 2011. However, the  intake capacity of Homoeopathy colleges had grown at a faster rate during the period 1993-2011, which had  been up from 5.0 in 1993 to 21.4 in 2011. Similarly, the intake capacity of Siddha colleges had been up from 20 in 1992 to 40 per college in 2011. However, in case of Unani system, the average admission capacities  had gone down from 16 in 1992 to 9.5 in 2005, then increased to 12.4 in 2011. The maximum intake capacity of 22.5 per AYUSH College was realized in 2010. The maximum intake capacities of 17.3 per Ayurveda college, 20 per Unani college, 45 per Siddha college and 33.5 per Homoeopathy college were realised during 2011, 1993, 2002-2004 and 2005 respectively.

As on 01.04.2011, States of Himachal Pradesh, Kerala and Rajasthan were having higher (more than 25) average admission capacities, whereas, states of Bihar (8) and Delhi (6) were having low(less than 10) average admission capacities. Rajasthan had maximum average admission capacity of 91 students per college in Ayurveda, while Delhi had minimum average admission capacity of 6 students per college. Maximum intake capacity of 50 students per college had been observed in the state of Bihar, whereas, minimum of 4 students in Delhi under Homoeopathy.  Andhra Pradesh had maximum intake capacity of 34 students per college under Unani and Uttar Pradesh had minimum of 6 students per Unani College. Tamilnadu had intake capacity of 40 students per college under Siddha.

Licensed Pharmacies
During the recent past, inclination of populace towards AYUSH System of medicine has been observed. To meet the increasing demand of AYUSH medicines, and to provide AYUSH medicines of reasonably good quality, there is a need to have licensed pharmacies for AYUSH medicines with good manufacturing practices. Prior to 2007, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) was mandatory for the Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani (ASU) drug manufacturing units only. It was also made mandatory for Homoeopathy in 2007.

 As on 1.4.2011, there were 8896 AYUSH drug manufacturing units (licensed pharmacies) in the country. Out  of these, 99.6% of the licensed  pharmacies were controlled by nongovernment bodies, and only 0.4% licensed pharmacies were in Government sector. System-wise distribution of these units were quite uneven as 86.5%  licensed pharmacies belonged to Ayurveda, whereas, 4.9%, 3.9% and 4.7% were under Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy systems respectively.

There were 28 states and union  territories of the country which have AYUSH licensed pharmacies as on 1.4.2011. No AYUSH drug  manufacturing unit have been reported in states of  Arunachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Manipur, Mizoram, Tripura, and in Union Territories of Andaman & Nicobar Islands and Lakshadweep. Uttar Pradesh has the Maximum number 2069 of AYUSH licensed pharmacies. The states of Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Kerala, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Uttar Pradesh each were  having more than 5% of AYUSH licensed pharmacies. Maximum number of Ayurveda and Unani pharmacies, viz., 1796 and 237  respectively are existed in the Uttar Pradesh. Licensed pharmacies under Siddha systems existed in the states of Tamil Nadu 332 Puducherry 10 and Kerala 4 only. A majority of Homoeopathy licensed pharmacies 25.36% existed in the state of West Bengal.

The States/ UTs of Arunachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Manipur, Mizoram,Tripura, Andaman & Nicobar Islands and Lakshadweep reported to have no licensed pharmacy under any AYUSH system.

Besides, there was no Ayurveda licensed pharmacy in Nagaland, and no Homoeopathy licensed pharmacy in Chhattisgarh, Goa, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Punjab, Rajasthan, Tripura, Sikkim, Uttarakhand, Chandigarh, Dadra & Nagar Haveli and Daman & Diu. Unani licensed pharmacies existed in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Delhi, Haryana, Jammu & Kashmir, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh,  Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and West Bengal.

Except Meghalaya and seven states mentioned above which had no AYUSH pharmacy, rest of the states have pharmacies with Good Manufacturing Practices. Out of all drug manufacturing  units, GMP-compliant units comprised 66.8% of the total drug manufacturing units, and within the total GMP-compliant units, 92.0% were Ayurveda drug manufacturing units and only 3.%, 3.5%  and 1.5% were Homoeopathy, Unani and Siddha drug manufacturing units respectively. The states/UTs having centpercent GMP-compliant drug manufacturing units were Delhi, Goa,  Nagaland, Sikkim, Himachal Pradesh, Chandigarh, Assam, Chhattisgarh, Jammu & Kashmir, Orissa, Punjab, Rajasthan, Dadra & Nagar Haveli and Daman & Diu.

The other states having higher (greater than 75%) proportion of GMP-compliant units were Andhra Pradesh, Haryana, Karnataka, Punjab and Uttar Pradesh, whereas, the states / union territories  having less than 25% GMP-compliance were Gujarat and Tamil Nadu, There had been a significant  system-wise variation in the proportion of GMP-compliant units, as there were 71.0%, 47.1%, 25.4%  and 43.7% GMP-compliant drug manufacturing units under Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and  Homoeopathy systems respectively.

The States/ UTs of Andhra Pradesh, Delhi, Goa, Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim, Uttar Pradesh, Chandigarh, Dadra & Nagar Haveli, Daman & Diu and Puducherry were having cent-percent GMPcompliant drug manufacturing units under Ayurveda system. Other states which have higher (greater than 75%) proportion of GMP-compliant units under Ayurveda were Chhattisgarh, Haryana, Karnataka, Punjab, Rajasthan and West Bengal.  All  Unani drug manufacturing units were GMPcompliant in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Delhi, Haryana, Karnataka, Kerala, and West Bengal. All Siddha drug manufacturing units were GMP-compliant  in the states of Kerala and Pudducherry, whereas, only 22.31% were GMP-compliant in the state of Tamilnadu.

Foreign Trade
AYUSH medicaments, medicinal plants and their by-products constitute an important part of the Indian Foreign Trade. This section on AYUSH related foreign trade provides a brief overview of  India’s foreign trade in respect of these AYUSH related products. A continuous growth in Export over Import as related to AYUSH Products has been observed during last five years that signify the  continuous increasing interest in AYUSH system of medicines outside the boundary of the territory.

Prior to 2003-04, for the purpose of foreign trade, AYUSH medicants and medicaments were categorized in two heads i.e., “AYURVEDIC & UNANI MEDICINES” and “HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINE” only. However, 2003-04 onwards, medicants and medicaments of Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, Homoeopathic and Bio-chemic systems have been differentiated and the import-export data related to foreign trade in respect of all these items is being recorded separately.

During the last four Plan periods, Total Trade of AYUSH related items had increased from Rs. 580.98 crore in 1995-96 to Rs. 1713.33 crore in 2010-11.  The export of AYUSH products has decreased from 2887.01 Crores in 2009-10 to 2099.00 Crores in 2010-11, showing an annual growth rate of -27% whereas the import of AYUSH products has increased by  11% annually, from 346.22 Crores in 2009-10 to 385.67 Crores in 2010-11. Thus, during this period the total trade of AYUSH products has decreased substantially from 3233.24 Crores in 2009-10 to  2484.67 Crores in 2010-11,  Since 2003-04, a continuous growing trend has been observed in India’s foreign trade with respect to  AYUSH related Items in  respect of export, import upto  2009-10. During 2010-11, declining trend has been observed in respect of export,  and Total Trade of AYUSH related Items whereas, Import has been increased.  During 2010-11, percentage share of AYUSH products in the total trade of 219India was 0.09%. Similarly, AYUSH products shared 0.18% of Export and 0.02% of Import of India. All India Balance of Trade have always been negative since the ninth plan period 1996-97, while AYUSH related products always shown a positive balance of Trade, indicating that AYUSH products are having significant role in foreign trade of the country.

Download full report : http://indianmedicine.nic.in/index2.asp?slid=671&sublinkid=261&lang=1

Comments

One Response so far.

  1. The 2 para contradict each other .one state no licensed pharmacy in Punjab, the 2nd state having higher GMP units.
    PARA 1

    Besides, there was no Ayurveda licensed pharmacy in Nagaland, and no Homoeopathy licensed pharmacy in Chhattisgarh, Goa, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Punjab, Rajasthan, Tripura, Sikkim, Uttarakhand, Chandigarh, Dadra & Nagar Haveli and Daman & Diu. Unani licensed

    PARA 2

    The other states having higher (greater than 75%) proportion of GMP-compliant units were Andhra Pradesh, Haryana, Karnataka, Punjab and Uttar Pradesh, whereas, the states / union territories having less than 25% GMP-compliance were Gujarat and Tamil Nadu, There had

    STATASTICS speak good about Ayush – NEED TO CHECK THE MISUSE OF NAME Ayurvedic Product, Homoeopathic product,Herbal Product needs attention,

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